Automatic level setting

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Automatic level setting

Postby bobchmara » Tue May 31, 2005 3:20 am

Does anyone know of a mixer control that automatically sets the line-in volume? I've come across the Easy Hi-Q Recorder from Roemer software but it does a lot more than I need. Ideally, I'd like something that replaced the Windows mixer control.
Thanks,
Bob Chmara
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Re: Automatic level setting

Postby adaywayne » Sat Jun 04, 2005 3:52 pm

bobchmara wrote:Does anyone know of a mixer control that automatically sets the line-in volume? I've come across the Easy Hi-Q Recorder from Roemer software but it does a lot more than I need. Ideally, I'd like something that replaced the Windows mixer control.

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What do you mean by "automatically set"? Are you referring to volume limiting? Why do you want to replace the Windows master volume controls?
Arnie
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Postby bobchmara » Sat Jun 04, 2005 5:11 pm

I was trying not to be too verbose in my question, but perhaps a bit more explanation is in order. I’m looking for a tool that will help me reduce the amount of time spent setting the input level. In practice, my process is typically a “two pass” process; I often listen to most of an album while monitoring and adjusting the line-in levels before I actually record the album. This is due to:
- I haven’t played much of the music in 10 years or more so I don’t remember where the loudest passages are on any given recording
- Similarly, some of the recordings were inherited and I’ve never played them before
- What sounds “intense” is not necessarily the part of the recording generating the highest signal

So that got me to wondering if there might be a piece of software that would monitor the input over a given period of time (the length of one side of an album) and then automatically set the input level accordingly. Alternately, something that would record the signal level and then let me adjust according to the data would serve the same purpose. I would still have a two pass process but it wouldn’t require me to manually monitor the input level during the length of the first pass.

As a follow up to my first post, I’ve learned that the Easy Hi-Q Recorder only serves this function over time spans of a few seconds. I would still have to identify the passages on the recording to which the tool should be applied.

On the other hand, my whole approach could be bass-ackwards in which case I’d welcome any suggestions.

I hope this helps.
Thanks,
Bob Chmara
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Postby citguy » Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:03 pm

Hi Bob. I do know you do not want to err on the high side because digital overload manifests itself as noise. I usually stay in the middle of the WC meters and nomalize later with an 8 to ten decible correction. I used to try to record at a higher level but usually regretted doing so due to loud spikes.

Stan
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Postby adaywayne » Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:42 pm

citguy wrote:Hi Bob. I do know you do not want to err on the high side because digital overload manifests itself as noise. I usually stay in the middle of the WC meters and nomalize later with an 8 to ten decible correction. I used to try to record at a higher level but usually regretted doing so due to loud spikes.

Stan

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Same here Stan. I usually aim for a peak of -5 to -7dB over both sides of an LP. Even though I know my records fairly well, I still overshoot -1dB from time to time and have to repeat the whole thing.

Of course, one doesn't have to listen to the whole recording. Having completed and saved the recording, it is quite simple in Wave Corrector or most other programs to find the highest peak. You can then zoom in on that area and see if any clipping has occurred. If not, simply use the normaliser function to reduce the overall level. But if you see those "flattened peaks", throw it out and record again.

On the other hand, there are programs that have a peak-limiting features. Some find those satisfactory, but it means you are really compressing the dynamic range
Arnie
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Picking the loudest part of an LP

Postby Sandy Fairservice » Sun Mar 06, 2011 10:01 pm

I did this all the time on air in the NZBC. Look at the disc at an angle. Some parts look grey, others darker. The grey is the loud audio. Put your pickup there and get a level, then back to the beginning and start transcribing. Works all the time and saves a lot of rehearsal.
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