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acceptance of wav files

PostPosted: Mon Jan 10, 2005 6:34 pm
by jhaubrich
it happened twice to me with wav-files from different sources, that
WaveCorr refused to load the files complaining that they were not
smapled at 44.1 kHz. At least in one of these cases, I was pretty sure
that the sampling rate was 44.1
So I have a feeling that WaveCorr would benifit if it were a little less
dainty.
Perhaps, other applications have their own interpretation on the rules
for the wav-format, but it would be nice of wavecorr could accept
other files than the ones sampled by wavecorr itself.

Another thing on my wishlist might be the ability to load two
files one after the other and then allowing me to combine them
to form just one big file.

Jacques

Re: acceptance of wav files

PostPosted: Tue Jan 11, 2005 9:49 am
by Derek
jhaubrich wrote:it happened twice to me with wav-files from different sources, that
WaveCorr refused to load the files complaining that they were not
smapled at 44.1 kHz. At least in one of these cases, I was pretty sure
that the sampling rate was 44.1
So I have a feeling that WaveCorr would benifit if it were a little less
dainty.
Perhaps, other applications have their own interpretation on the rules
for the wav-format, but it would be nice of wavecorr could accept
other files than the ones sampled by wavecorr itself.

Another thing on my wishlist might be the ability to load two
files one after the other and then allowing me to combine them
to form just one big file.

Jacques

It's not just the 44.1kHz sample rate that is important. The file also has to be stereo and use 16-bit sampling. Unfortunately, these restrictions are rather deeply embedded in the Wave Corrector code (it uses a 32-bit data structure for each stereo pair of samples). This makes for fast processing but it means that the wave file must conform to this format.

However, provided a wave file meets this specification, then there should be no problem opening it. If you come across such a file that won't open, please let me know.

RE

PostPosted: Tue Jan 11, 2005 5:17 pm
by jack
It seems a lot to ask (impossible task) to be able to process an unlimited variety of sampling rates. The easiest thing to do is simply convert the file to a 44.1K stereo one. This is done with any audio editor by opening it and then saving it with another name at the 44.1K standard. You should be able to do this with even low quality MP3 files.

There is also freeware and converter type programs that will convert audio files, but most serious audio nuts will make good use of an audio editor (like SoundForge [now Sony] or CoolEdit [now Adobe]).

PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2005 4:37 pm
by uncletodd
I use Nero Editor to convert crummy MP3's and non compliant WAV files to get the correct settings to use WC. Works for me

PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2005 4:46 pm
by citguy
As far as mergiing files I will repeat the advice Derek offered me. Download "WavMerge" at
<http://www.mrichter.com/cdr/files/files.htm>

It does a good job of combining wave files before loading into Wave Corrector.

Stan[/url]

Re: acceptance of wav files

PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2005 10:54 pm
by benbradley
jhaubrich wrote:it happened twice to me with wav-files from different sources, that
WaveCorr refused to load the files complaining that they were not
smapled at 44.1 kHz. At least in one of these cases, I was pretty sure
that the sampling rate was 44.1
So I have a feeling that WaveCorr would benifit if it were a little less
dainty.
Perhaps, other applications have their own interpretation on the rules
for the wav-format, but it would be nice of wavecorr could accept
other files than the ones sampled by wavecorr itself.


I presume, as others, that these .wav files are something other than 16-bit stereo files. If it really IS 16-bit stereo at 44.1k and still won't load, then I'm sure the programmers will want to see the fille to figure out why it doesn't load.
Someone else mentioned Nero for conversion of bit depth, sample rate and stereo/mono. I use Cool Edit 2000, which was one a great under-$100 editor, but Adobe bought Cool Edit, renamed everything Audition and only offer a more expensive multitrack version.
I've recently been using Audacity, a free recording/editing system, it seems to have a lot of features though I haven't used everything yet, but it can probably do most of what Cool Edit does. It's available at:
http://audacity.sourceforge.net.


Another thing on my wishlist might be the ability to load two
files one after the other and then allowing me to combine them
to form just one big file.

Jacques


This appears to be a philosophy difference... That's a feature that any .wav editor has. You may want Wave Corrector to be an 'all in one' system that does all these things, but I like the philosophy of 'modulatiry', of several tools, each one that does a certain job really well. I'd rather have Wave Corrector have, for example, better declicking and click detection (which is the heart of what I use it for), rather than features not directly related to restoration and that are commonly available in other tools.

I just got the update/beta email and haven't use this thing in many months, so I need to run it a while and figure out what all the new options are before I comment further, else I may end up asking for something that's already in it.